Anatomy

Anatomy has been a mainstay since the inception of veterinary training and each school developed a teaching body of work which brought together a wide variety of pieces.

The Fragonard Museum at the School of Alfort has hundreds of coloured, plaster casts, representing the muscles or organs of domestic animals on a natural scale. Its oldest pieces are those made by Honoré Fragonard (1732-1799) between 1766 and 1771. These écorchés are real human and animal cadavers that were mummified in order to display their anatomy when the dissection of corpses was not possible. The most impressive one is probably the rider, a young man riding a horse at a brisk pace. Combining technical quality and an aesthetic dimension, this piece is indicative of a movement rooted in the 18th century and looks to show the inevitable union between man and animals.

The most impressive piece of the Fragonard Museum is the rider, a young man riding a horse at a brisk pace. Combining technical quality and an aesthetic dimension, this piece is indicative of a movement that looks to show the inevitable union between man and animals.

Observers could well find that these two beings, so dissimilar in appearance, are built on the same pattern and that there is merely some variation between the two anatomies.

Many veterinary school collections include paper mache pieces that Dr. Auzoux (1797-1880) dedicated to the horse. The most impressive ones are the large models that he produced from 1844 onwards to mimic the dissection of this species.

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