Restore or renew?

The work of restoring a carriage must meet a specific objective: either to keep the car as an object of collection, or to use it for practice driving. This choice will determine the nature and extent of the restoration or renovation.

In the former case, the original state of the object must be preserved as much as possible. Restoration is then limited to essential actions ensuring the preservation of the object and its appropriate presentation. The more discrete the actions the more value the carriage will retain: the value of historical and technical testimony as an object of reference object, on one hand, and its market value, on the other.

Restoration is then limited to essential actions ensuring the preservation of the object and its appropriate presentation

In the latter case, while trying to preserve its original features as much as possible, it is necessary to restore the carriage's soundness, which is essential for the safety of the transported passengers and horses. This often leads to remaking and replacing parts weakened by alterations, whereas in the former case, they would have been retained after a simple consolidation. A carriage to be used for riding must resist the powerful pull of the horses, bumps caused by irregularities and uneven ground and the weight of the passengers.

These works have their limitations. A carriage in poor condition requiring comprehensive reconstruction of the body and wheels no longer has any authentic character: the result of such a renovation is, at best, an exact copy.

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